Gone With the Weathering: The Result — Erosion   Western Reserve Public Media
What's Left Behind: Redepositing Fast Weathering Slow Weathering Overview Resources Teacher Materials Watch Gone With the Weathering: The Result -- Erosion Online Desert Photography
Credits

Project Coordinator
Maria Mastromatteo, Western Reserve Public Media

 

Teacher Guide
Teacher Design Team
Cathy Page Adler, Ravenna School District

Theresa Boyle, Crestwood Local School District

Maria Mastromatteo, Western Reserve Public Media

Barb Moore, Western Reserve Public Media

Teacher Guide Layout and Design
Paula Kritz, Western Reserve Public Media

 

Video
Produced by Western Reserve Public Media (WNEO/WEAO, Youngstown/Akron, Ohio)

Executive Producer
Maria Mastromatteo, Western Reserve Public Media

Producer
Duilio Mariola, Western Reserve Public Media

Videographer
Duilio Mariola, Western Reserve Public Media

Video Script
Larry Chance, Chance Productions

Photographs
Rod Chlysta, Photographer
Professional Development

Script
Cathy Adler, Ravenna School District

 

Web
Layout and Design
Paula Kritz, Western Reserve Public Media

 

Funding
This series was funded by the Ohio Legislature through the eTech Ohio Commission.

Gone With the Weathering: The Result — Erosion Overview

Did you ever wonder why the Cuyahoga River is so crooked, the Rocky Mountains are so high or the road by your house gets so bumpy? The lessons in this guide and the accompanying videos will help you discover how majestic mountains, crooked rivers and bumpy roads are formed. This teacher guide is divided into three sections: slow weathering, fast weathering and the redepositing of sediments. In each section, the desert is used as an example of the results of weathering and erosion.

 

Part 1: Slow Weathering

Specific to this unit are lesson plans on icebergs and glaciers and their effect on the earth. Additional lesson plans help students to identify landforms and understand what created them. A special section offers instruction on slow erosion forces in desert areas.

 

Part 2: Fast Weathering

This unit begins with a lesson that introduces all the rapid processes and is followed by hands-on lessons on earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis and floods. It also includes a special concentration on how these rapid forces affect the desert regions.

 

Part 3: What’s Left Behind: Redepositing

This unit begins with a PowerPoint lesson that explains what redepositing is. Using maps of the continental United States, the lessons ask students to locate various redepositing landmarks. Students also work in pairs to make a book about canyons, sandbars, deltas, caves and other natural formations created through redepositing. A special concentration of the desert and what landforms are found there along with a story-writing activity finish the unit.

 

Standards Addressed

Current Standards

Grade 4

Earth and Space Science

3-5 Benchmark B. Summarize the processes that shape Earth’s surface and describe evidence of those processes.

Y2003.CSC.S01.G03-05.BB.L04.I08  Processes That Shape Earth /

08. Describe how wind, water and ice shape and reshape Earth’s land surface by eroding rock and soil in some areas and depositing them in other areas producing characteristic landforms (e.g., dunes, deltas and glacial moraines).

 

Y2003.CSC.S01.G03-05.BB.L04.I09  Processes That Shape Earth /

09. Identify and describe how freezing, thawing and plant growth reshape the land surface by causing the weathering of rock.

 

Y2003.CSC.S01.G03-05.BB.L04.I10  Processes That Shape Earth /

10. Describe evidence of changes on Earth’s surface in terms of slow processes (e.g., erosion, weathering, mountain building and deposition) and rapid processes (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and landslides).

 

Common Core Standards

Strand: Earth and Space Science (ESS)

Topic: This topic focuses on the variety of processes that shape and reshape Earth’s surface.

  • Earth’s surface has specific characteristics and landforms that can be identified.

  • The surface of Earth changes due to weathering.

  • The surface of Earth changes due to erosion and deposition.

 
pbs.org Copyright©2012, Northeastern Educational Television of Ohio, Inc. All rights reserved.