Sharing Art
Western Reserve Public Media
 
Mixed Media Project

Overview

Regional Artists: Laurel Winters, Akron
Featured Museum: Canton Museum of Art
Featured Artist: John Sokol
Featured Work of Art: "T.S. Elliot"
Featured Teacher: Matt Beresh, Mogadore Local Schools

Lesson Overview:
Students will produce a multimedia work that includes a quote. Other media will be used to illustrate the quote.

 

Video Synopsis

Mixed media artist Laurel Winters creates collages with quotes using computer printing, acrylic paints, stamping, oil pastels and symbols from different cultures. The school project follows her lead in using quotes to suggest themes for student collages.

 

Objectives

Students will:

  • learn, understand and critique the historical context and collage techniques of art works by Robert Rauschenburg, Pablo Picasso and Georges Braques.

  • create an original multimedia work of art incorporating acrylic paint, thematic quote, cloth, photocopies and various other collage materials.

     

 

Vocabulary

  • Multimedia

  • Composition

  • Abstract

  • Combine paintings

  • Linear/non-linear formats

 

Materials

  • 18" x 24" white mat board

  • Scissors

  • Brushes

  • Acrylic gel

  • Tempera paint

  • Rubber cement (or healthier substitute)

  • Images by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braques (Cubist collage paintings) and Robert Rauschenburg (Pop Art combine paintings)

 

 

Procedure

Day 1:
Show slides and/or reproductions of examples of Cubist collage paintings by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braques and Pop Art combine paintings by Robert Rauschenburg. Discuss the historical significance of collage in Cubism and its connection to Pop Art. Analyze and interpret as a class one of Rauschenburg’s combine paintings:

  • Describe the work: What do you see in the artwork? What colors and images are used?

  • Analyze the work: Are there any repetitions in the work? How has the artist used balance?

  • Interpret the work: Why did he incorporate particular images (newspaper clippings) in his work? How do the colors relate to the mood set within the work? What is the artist trying to say with this piece? What makes this a work of art? Why is it important?

Break students into small groups and pass out different handouts of Rauschenburg reproductions for each group to interpret. Have students develop three high-level questions and then have them present their questions and interpretations to the class.

Day 2:
Show the Sharing Art video, “Mixed Media.” Discuss Laurel Winters’ style of painting and how it relates to the art history lesson.

Have students choose a theme (love, family, friendship, etc.). The students will research that theme on the Internet and in literature, songs, etc., and choose a quote, lyric, etc. that corresponds to that theme (may include extra time in school library/media center).

Day 3:
Students will formulate their quote on a word processor in an appropriate font that corresponds to their theme. (If students have access to a copy machine, allow them to experiment with enlargements and reductions, or work one-on-one to determine their need and photocopy their quote for them.)

Have students work on thumbnail sketches of a composition that emphasizes balance, rhythm and a focal point pertaining to their theme.

Days 4 & 5:
Students apply acrylic gel medium and place photocopies of their quotes onto their mat board. Application of tempera paint will follow in innovative ways as Laurel Winters explained — wash, squirt gun, splatter, runs, foam stamps, etc. Various other materials may be added — photocopies of labyrinths, Celtic images, or any non-representational designs along with fabric, etc.

 

Lower Grade Level Project

Lower Grade Lesson Overview

Students will create an original work of art using imagery and color to illustrate a single feeling word (hot, cold, icy, hurt, happy, challenging, etc.).

 

Lower Grade Objectives

  • Students will learn and understand visual imagery and language in the mass media.

  • Students will verbalize criticism and judgment of personal and peer artwork.

  • Students will create an original artwork that illustrates a word.

 

Materials

  •  3" x 12" white paper

  • Rulers

  • Pencil

  • Colored pencils

  • Various advertisement examples

  • 9" x 12" black poster board

  • Carbon paper

  •  Rubber cement or healthier substitute

 

Procedures

Day 1:
Show examples of advertisements in pop culture. (Food ads may work best here — cereal boxes, newspaper coupon inserts, etc.) Discuss how the advertiser uses color and font style to portray the idea of the product in the product name. Compare and analyze various advertisements and the mood created. “Which ones best create a mood and feeling for what you are buying? Why? How is the mood created?” Show “Mixed Media” video featuring Laurel Winters. Discuss how she incorporates the photocopy, quote, image, etc. into her painting and how the colors and style reflect the mood of the quote. Break students into small groups and have them brainstorm and list as many feeling words they can think of (hot, cold, icy, hurt, happy, challenging, etc.). Collect lists at end of class. Write each word from the lists on separate note cards for students to choose next class time. Make enough word cards for each student to choose two.

Day 2:
Hang up all word note cards on bulletin board. Have students come up one at a time and pick one note card each. (You may want to pick students’ names out of a hat). After all students have picked two words, pass out two 3" x 12"pieces of white paper. Have the students develop their drawings on the first strip of paper, utilizing imagery and color to illustrate that word. (Once they have a rough draft drawing exactly as they want it, they will transfer it to the second strip of white paper)

Note: Some words may be better illustrated in a non-linear format. The size of the paper strip may be customized to fit the individual need.

Day 3:
Have students work on their illustrated word project.

Day 4:
Have students hang up the word project they have been working on. Moderate a discussion of each one, inviting students to identify at least one positive aspect and make at least one suggestion for each. Discuss appropriate choices of images and future color choices. Students can work on their projects in the remaining class time.

Days 5 & 6:
When students finish their rough draft word, have them transfer it with carbon paper or pencil rubbing to the final strip of white paper, making sure it is centered with at least one-inch border on the left margin. When finished, have students cut and leave a one-inch border on the other margins, add color and center-mount the drawing with rubber cement or double-sided tape onto a piece of black, or choice, paper.

 

 

Higher Grade Level Project

Higher Grade Overview

The students will illustrate a social issue by creating an original multimedia work of art that incorporates acrylic and tempera paint, newspaper clippings, cloth and various other collage materials.

 

Higher Grade Objectives

  • Learn, understand, and critique the historical context and collage techniques of artwork by Robert Rauschenburg.

  • Create an original multimedia work of art that discusses a social issue, incorporating acrylic and tempera paint, newspaper clippings, cloth and various other collage materials.

  • Verbalize criticism and judgment of personal and peer artwork.

 

Materials

  • Reproduction(s) of Rauschenburg’s paintings, including “Gloria”

  • 18" x 24" pieces of mat board

  • Recent newspapers

  • News magazines

 

Procedures

At least one week prior to the project, tell students to begin collecting newspapers and specific news stories that have had an impact on them. Have students keep an ongoing reaction journal on at least three stories for five days.

Day 1:
Show slides and pass out reproductions of Rauschenburg’s combine paintings.  Discuss the background of Rauschenburg, his style and historical significance.  Display “Gloria” and break students into small groups. Have students describe, analyze and interpret his painting. Have students share their interpretations with the class in brief presentations.

Day 2:
Show video on mixed media featuring artist Laurel Winters. Discuss Laurel Winters’ style of painting and how it relates to the art history lesson. Have students choose one of the news stories they collected as the focus for their painting. Have students brainstorm ideas for their paintings — discuss color choice, composition and repetition.

Day 3:
Pass out mat boards and have students pencil out composition. The background may be painted first.

Days 4 & 5:
Have students work on collage paintings. Newspaper clippings are applied with acrylic gel or the paint itself.

Day 5 or 6:
In-progress critique of paintings. Discuss the mood set by the clippings. Make sure each student understands the success of the point he/she is trying to make between the social issue and its visual depiction.

Days 7 & 8:
Students finish paintings. Conduct a final critique.

 

 

Assessment

  • Incorporate an in-progress and/or final critique of students’ mixed media paintings as a class discussion.

  • How well did students critique the artwork seen in the slides?

  • How well did the students connect visual imagery with their quote?

  • How well did the students critique the artwork of their classmates?

  • Were basic guidelines for the project followed?

 

 

Lower Grade Assessment

Incorporate an in-progress and/or final critique of their mixed media paintings as a class discussion, answering these questions:

  • How well did students illustrate their word visually?

  • How well did students critique class projects?

  • Was craftsmanship neat and presentable?

  •  Were basic guidelines for the project followed?

 

Higher Grade Assessment

Incorporate an in-progress and/or final critique of their mixed media paintings as a class discussion, answering these questions:

  • How well did the students connect visual imagery with the chosen newspaper clipping?

  • How well did students critique the artwork of the featured artists?

  • How well did the students critique the artwork of their classmates?

  • How successful were students in depicting mood and theme through an abstract style?

  • Were basic guidelines for the project followed?

 

 
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