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Grade 9-12
Mechanical Waves (Science - High School)

Mechanical Waves (Science - High School)

Learn about mechanical waves, which transfers energy from one place to another through liquids, gases and solids, with this interactive lesson.

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Invisible Man: The Hero's Journey (ELA - Grade 12)

Invisible Man: The Hero's Journey (ELA - Grade 12)

This video from the American Masters film Ralph Ellison: An American Journey provides a plot summary of Invisible Man focusing on the protagonist’s journey from innocence to maturity. The background essay describes the stages of Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey” and students are invited to compare Ellison’s novel to Campbell’s monomyth. This resource is recommended for use after students have read Invisible Man in its entirety.

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Climate Change Projections (Math - Grade 11)

Climate Change Projections (Math - Grade 11)

The Colorado River streamflow is projected to decrease over the course of this century. The estimates range from about 5% to 15%. It just being warmer, means less snowpack, which then turns into less water into the water systems that we're managing.

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How Does Evolution Really Work? (Science - Grade 10)

How Does Evolution Really Work? (Science - Grade 10)

Visit Ecuador to examine the research of Chris Schneider, a modern-day Darwin, in this video from Evolution. Schneider is advancing scientific understanding of evolution through his study of natural selection in hummingbird populations at various elevations.

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Kal Penn: Gandhi's Salt March (Social Studies - Grade 9)

Kal Penn: Gandhi's Salt March (Social Studies - Grade 9)

Actor and comedian Kal Penn’s experience with immigration is fairly recent; his family came to America in the 1960s and Kal was born and raised in suburban New Jersey. He was influenced by his maternal grandfather who marched with Gandhi in the Salt March, a protest against British imperialism.

In 1858, the British Crown took control of India from the East India Company, a company created by the British government to establish trade in the East Indies. During its reign, the British exploited India’s resources and imposed a harsh and violent rule over the Indian people. Britain maintained control until India established its independence in 1947.

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Zombies and Calculus - Part 2 (Math - Grade 12)

Zombies and Calculus - Part 2 (Math - Grade 12)

Learn about tangent vectors in this video from NOVA Digital. In this hypothetical world, zombies always move straight toward humans. This means that the tangent vector of a zombie's path points at the intended target. However, when the human moves, the zombie's tangent vector points to where the human is at that instant, not to where the human is going. The zombie is not smart enough to move toward where the human will be. Therefore, the zombie takes a longer path, giving the human the chance to get away. If the human moves faster than the zombies in a circular path, multiple zombies will eventually converge on a smaller circular path that follows the human's path.

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The Fate of Carbon (Science - Grade 11)

The Fate of Carbon (Science - Grade 11)

Students examine the importance of carbon and learn about two Earth systems, the solubility pump and the biological pump, which cycle carbon from the atmosphere into the oceans and back again. In this interactive lesson, students watch short descriptive videos about this topic. They read and highlight video transcripts and complete short writing assignments that reflect what they've learned. As a final assignment, students recreate the steps involved in both pumps and then write a clear, descriptive paragraph or two describing one of the pumps.

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Red Scare Crackdown - The Bombing of Wall Street (Social Studies - Grade 10)

Red Scare Crackdown - The Bombing of Wall Street (Social Studies - Grade 10)

Learn how the U.S. government cracked down on terrorism threats and left-wing activism in America during the “Red Scare” of 1919–1920, in the wake of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, in these videos adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Bombing of Wall Street. As a wave of anti-capitalist uprisings swept through Europe and elsewhere, activists in the United States planted the seeds of revolution at home. In response to a series of bomb attempts, U.S. Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer formed a new intelligence unit, the “Radical Division,” to keep tabs on potential threats. Led by J. Edgar Hoover, the unit launched raids against suspected radical groups. Thousands of people, immigrants and American citizens alike, were detained, often without warrants or specific cause. Many of them were deported to Russia.

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Symbolism (ELA - Grade 9)

Symbolism (ELA - Grade 9)

Explore how authors use symbolism to add a deeper level of meaning to their work in this short animated video from WNET. Discussion questions below help students to further apply their understanding before analyzing a text.

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Deciding Your City's Energy Future (Science - Grade 12)

Deciding Your City's Energy Future (Science - Grade 12)

Students learn about fossil fuels and renewable energy sources to help them decide which type of energy should be used to power a city’s electric grid in the coming decades. In this interactive lesson, students watch videos adapted from NOVA: Treasures of the Earth: Power and analyze data provided in graphs and maps concerning the availability, cost, reliability, and environmental impact of different energy sources. They use what they learn from the lesson materials to make an evidence-based argument that supports their decision.

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What was "Freedom Summer"? (Social Studies - Grade 11)

What was "Freedom Summer"? (Social Studies - Grade 11)

This video from American Experience: “Freedom Summer” introduces the events of 1964, when over 700 students, black and white, came to Mississippi to help black citizens register to vote as well as combat other forms of discrimination, such as inadequate schools and lack of legal aid. Organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), civil rights activists hoped that the participation of well-educated, middle-class students, many from prestigious universities, would not only bring results but draw the attention of the nation to the miserable standard of living suffered by blacks in Mississippi.

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The Crucible - Inspiration and Reception (ELA - Grade 10)

The Crucible - Inspiration and Reception (ELA - Grade 10)

This media gallery explores the inspiration for and reception of The Crucible during the Hollywood Blacklist with videos from the American Masters film None Without Sin. The videos and support materials are best used during or after a reading of The Crucible. Using video, text, graphic organizers and text-dependent discussion questions, students will better understand the symbolism of The Crucible and why Arthur Miller was compelled to write the play.

Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

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Graphing Fuzzy Logic (Math - Grade 9)

Graphing Fuzzy Logic (Math - Grade 9)

Learn about differences between fuzzy and binary logic systems with this activity adapted from Scientific American Frontiers. Students will read an introduction to fuzzy logic and then interpret a graph that illustrates the variable condition of a lamp controlled by a fuzzy logic circuit. After answering questions about the graph, students can extend their understanding by considering how fuzzy logic could apply to various devices and appliances such as a camera, a vacuum cleaner, or a coffeemaker.

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Having a Strong National Government (Social Studies - Grade 12)

Having a Strong National Government (Social Studies - Grade 12)

By the end of George Washington’s presidency in 1797, the country had split into factions and two distinct political parties had emerged. The Federalists believed in a strong national government while their opponents believed that a strong national government would be no different from the monarchy they had fought against during the battle for independence. This video segment from The Supreme Court highlights the partisan battles between the Federalists, led by Chief Justice John Marshall, and Thomas Jefferson, his cousin and a strong opponent of Federalism.

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Exploring Music, Props, and Race | Great Performances: Much Ado About Nothing (Reading/ELA - High School)

Exploring Music, Props, and Race | Great Performances: Much Ado About Nothing (Reading/ELA - High School)

Great Performances: Much Ado About Nothing features an all-black cast as well as music and prop choices that represent important cultural touchstones in African American and American culture. Put students in the mind of the director to analyze why culturally-specific design choices may have been made for this modern production of Shakespeare’s classic play.

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Popcorn Picker: Volumes of Solid Shapes (Math - High School)

Popcorn Picker: Volumes of Solid Shapes
(Math - High School)

Experiment with the volume of two cylinders made from the same size paper. This interactive exercise focuses on using what you know about cylinders to make a prediction about their volume and then requires calculating the actual volume to see if your prediction was accurate.

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Is There Life in Space? (Science - Grade 9)

Is There Life in Space? (Science - Grade 9)

The High-Adventure Science Space Module contains five activities. In this module, you will explore the question, “Is there life in space?” You will discover how scientists find planets and other astronomical bodies through the wobble (also known as Doppler spectroscopy or radial-velocity) and transit methods. Then you will compare zones of habitability around different star types, discovering the zone of liquid water possibility around each star type. Finally, you will explore how scientists use spectroscopy to learn about atmospheres on distant planets. You will not be able to answer the question at the end of the module, but you will be able to explain how scientists find distant planets and moons and how they determine whether those astronomical bodies could be habitable.

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The Politics of College Programs in US Prisons (Social Studies - High School)

The Politics of College Programs in US Prisons (Social Studies - High School)

After watching select video clips about the structure of the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI), the effects of mass incarceration, and the purpose of prison, students will analyze and discuss the politics of offering college courses to incarcerated individuals in U.S. prisons. Since federal funding for prison education programs was eliminated in 1995, BPI is one of a limited number of college degree granting programs available in U.S. prisons.

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The Bolshevik Revolution - Lasting Effects (Social Studies - High School)

The Bolshevik Revolution - Lasting Effects (Social Studies - High School)

The images in this media gallery depict the transformations that occurred in Russia between 1914 and 1920. As you view these, pay close attention to the way commoners and laborers played a role in the Revolution. Be sure to also read the background essay and complete the worksheet included in the Support Materials.

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American Masters - Gatsby Chases the American Dream (ELA - High School)

American Masters - Gatsby Chases the American Dream (ELA - High School)

In this video from the American Masters film Novel Reflections on the American Dream, learn about F. Scott Fitzgerald and his notorious fictional character Jay Gatsby. Both were in the pursuit of the American dream and love. Students will explore the topic of the American dream as it applies to the book and to their own lives through the accompanying teaching tips.

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The Catcher in the Rye and First Person Narrative (ELA - High School)

The Catcher in the Rye and First Person Narrative (ELA - High School)

J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye gave a voice to the rise of discontent in American popular culture. The novel incorporated the everyday slang of teenagers, and by doing so, shed light on the power of first-person narratives. Experts and celebrity authors explore this phenomenon through the lens of Holden Caulfield—one of literature's most iconic teens—thereby peeling back the curtain on why Holden remains timeless character, and what makes Catcher a revolutionary read.

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Acceptance and the Merchant of Venice (ELA - High School)

Acceptance and the Merchant of Venice (ELA - High School)

At a time when nationalism and extremism are on the rise, questions about the importance of understanding and acceptance raised in the “Hath not a Jew eyes?” speech from The Merchant of Venice are particularly relevant. In these videos from Shakespeare Uncovered, explore what it means to be an outsider and the impact of persecution. Support materials engage students with contemporary connections through discussion questions and a handout analyzing Shylock’s speech.

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Understanding a Crowd's Predictive Ability (Math - High School)

Understanding a Crowd's Predictive Ability (Math - High School)

Examine a mathematical theory known as the “wisdom of crowds,” which holds that a crowd’s predictive ability is greater than that of an individual, in this video from NOVA: Prediction by the Numbers. Sir Francis Galton documented this phenomenon after witnessing a weight-guessing contest more than a hundred years ago at a fair. Statistician Talithia Williams tests Galton’s theory with modern-day fairgoers, asking them to guess the number of jelly beans in a jar. Use this resource to stimulate thinking and questions about the use of statistics in everyday life and to make evidence-based claims about predictive ability

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You Pour, I Choose: The Volume of Cylinders (Math - High School)

You Pour, I Choose: The Volume of Cylinders (Math - High School)

Compare the volume of varied cylindrical glasses filled to different heights. This interactive exercise focuses on using what you know about cylinders to make a prediction about their volume and then requires calculating the actual volume to see if your prediction was accurate.

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Math of Energy - Fossil Fuel Usage (Math - High School)

Math of Energy - Fossil Fuel Usage (Math - High School)

The use of fossil fuels, which has increased steadily since the beginning of the 20th century, has enabled many advancements in the quality of life around the world. However, fossil fuels are a limited resource and could become scarce during the 21st century. To create projections for future global energy consumption, we can apply lines of best-fit to historical data. There are several estimates of fossil fuel reserves remaining in the earth and these estimates are continually revised. In order to estimate when fossil fuels will be exhausted, we can equate the total fossil fuel resource base with the integral of our line of best-fit and solve for the time. The data in this episode is taken from 2012 studies on fossil fuel consumption.

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Economic Impact of a Changing Middle Class (Math - High School)

Economic Impact of a Changing Middle Class (Math - High School)

Students analyze economic data to better understand America’s middle class, its role in the economy, and its impact on economic growth. In this interactive lesson, students use media produced for How the Deck Is Stacked, and tables and graphs created from Pew Research Center and government data to examine household income and spending trends and the widening wealth gap between the upper and lower income tiers. Interim assessments evaluate students’ ability to interpret data, make inferences, and justify conclusions. At the end of the lesson, students write an evidence-based essay on why a shrinking middle class matters to the U.S. economy.

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Mechanical Waves (Science - High School)

Mechanical Waves (Science - High School)

Learn about mechanical waves, which transfers energy from one place to another through liquids, gases and solids, with this interactive lesson.

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Albedo Decrease Linked to Vanishing Arctic Sea Ice (Science - High School)

Albedo Decrease Linked to Vanishing Arctic Sea Ice (Science - High School)

This visualization from NASA shows the correlation between a decline in Arctic sea ice and the resulting decrease in planetary albedo over the past few decades. Use this resource to stimulate thinking about the impact that changes in sea ice cover can have on Earth’s albedo in the Arctic and to visualize data on Arctic sea ice.

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Reclaiming Habitat for Honey Bees (Science - Middle School)

Cracking your Genetic Code (Science - High School)

In this interactive lesson, students examine technologies that help scientists better understand and manipulate the human genome—the complete set of genes that all of us possess. Students also learn about the ethical concerns that some people have over how these technologies are being used today and how they may be used in the future. The lesson contains videos that feature scientists, doctors, patients, and ethicists, whose stories and opinions reveal a range of perspectives. The lesson concludes with a final assignment that asks students to weigh the potential benefits and drawbacks of genetic technologies.

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Reclaiming Habitat for Honey Bees (Science - Middle School)

Cloud Typing Interactive (Science - High School)

Try your hand at classifying clouds in this interactive from the NOVA Cloud Lab. Covering some 70 percent of Earth's surface, clouds play a key role in our planet's well-being. But how do they form, why are there so many types, and what clues can they give us about the weather and climate to come? This Cloud Lab interactive challenges you to look closely and classify each cloud type, from cirrus to cumulus to altostratus.

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Change your Mind: Appeal to Emotion (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Change your Mind: Appeal to Emotion (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Students will be bombarded with persuasive techniques in all aspects of their life. They need to recognize the persuasive techniques that are being used to manipulate their thinking and how they can use these same techniques to influence others.

Appeal to Emotion considers the effects of emotional pleas on the audience. Whether using powerful new images or words in text or speech, appeals to emotion are powerful.

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Change your Mind: Appeal to Logic (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Change your Mind: Appeal to Logic (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Students will be bombarded with persuasive techniques in all aspects of their life. They need to recognize the persuasive techniques that are being used to manipulate their thinking and how they can use these same techniques to influence others.

Appeal to Logic shows how rational arguments and the use of facts, figures and statistics can help to support one’s position.

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Change your Mind: Appeal to Authority (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Change your Mind: Appeal to Authority (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Students will be bombarded with persuasive techniques in all aspects of their life. They need to recognize the persuasive techniques that are being used to manipulate their thinking and how they can use these same techniques to influence others.

Appeal to Authority shows how an expert can be used to provide credibility or importance to a product or service. The expert can be real or perceived.

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Change your Mind: Loaded Language (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Change your Mind: Loaded Language (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Students will be bombarded with persuasive techniques in all aspects of their life. They need to recognize the persuasive techniques that are being used to manipulate their thinking and how they can use these same techniques to influence others.

Loaded Language deals with the concept of purposely using connotations, or the meanings that words have beyond the dictionary definitions, to persuade or manipulate people’s thinking.

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Change your Mind: Bandwagon (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Change your Mind: Bandwagon (ELA - Grades 8-10)

Students will be bombarded with persuasive techniques in all aspects of their life. They need to recognize the persuasive techniques that are being used to manipulate their thinking and how they can use these same techniques to influence others.

Bandwagon shows how the need to be part of the group can be a very convincing tool of persuasion.

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Julius Caeser and the American Experience (ELA - High School)

Julius Caeser and the American Experience (ELA - High School)

Learn about the long-held American fascination with Julius Caesar in two videos from Shakespeare Uncovered. Brian Cox states, “Rome is not a place, but an ideal,” and that the play continues to resonate because it addresses issues that face any society that tries to uphold democratic principles. The videos and support materials explore the parallels between the play and the American experience. Since Abraham Lincoln’s assassination by John Wilkes Booth, an actor obsessed with Brutus, the play continues to hold a place in the political and cultural landscape of America.

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Woman and Gender Roles (ELA - High School)

Woman and Gender Roles (ELA - High School)

This resource focuses on the portrayal of women and gender in Great Performances: Much Ado About Nothing starring Danielle Brooks. Students will consider the meaning of gender in Shakespeare’s world and the contemporary milieu, and use video clips to engage in a critical analysis of the depiction of women and gender roles. In considering the way in which the production plays with ideas of gender and power, students will think about how Shakespeare’s plays endure over time.

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Supernatural Elements of Macbeth (ELA - High School)

Supernatural Elements of Macbeth (ELA - High School)

In this self-paced lesson, students explore how Shakespeare uses supernatural elements in Macbeth. The lesson begins with an exploration of beliefs about the supernatural and witchcraft in Shakespeare’s time as presented in a segment from Shakespeare Uncovered. Students turn to the text of Macbeth and analyze the action, imagery, characterization, and language of Act I, Scene iii (the scene in which Macbeth and Banquo first encounter the witches and hear their predictions). Then, students view another segment from Shakespeare Uncovered and explore key questions about the role of the witches in the action of Macbeth. Finally, they examine other supernatural episodes in the play and produce a paper exploring the impact and meaning of one of these episodes. This lesson is best used after a reading of Macbeth.

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Native American Mythology (ELA - High School)

Native American Mythology (ELA - High School)

The film Words from a Bear: N. Scott Momaday delves into the psyche behind the celebrated award-winning author and visually captures the essence of Momaday’s writings. Although his heritage is a central theme, Momaday’s work asks universal questions: what are our origins and how do we connect to them through our collective memories? This collection of resources from the film illuminates how Momaday grappled with these questions, his identity and the challenges of being a Native American artist in today's world.

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Zombies and Calculus, Part 1

Zombies and Calculus, Part 1 (Math - High School)

Learn about the math behind predator-prey population cycles in this video from NOVA Digital. In this example, zombie and human populations fluctuate. The zombie population increases as zombies convert humans into zombies. However, without enough humans to eat, zombies die and the population shrinks. The human population increases as humans reproduce but decreases as zombies eat humans. The populations of humans and zombies change through time according to a pair of differential equations. Because human and zombie populations are related, the growth rate of each population depends on the current numbers of both humans and zombies.

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Statistics: Using Sampling to Count Trees

Statistics: Using Sampling to Count Trees (Math - High School)

In this activity, students will learn about estimating the number of trees in a large area based on a smaller area. This is one way statisticians measure forests and other wide expanses of land. It's also a great way to illustrate how polling works. Scientists will interview a smaller sample size of Americans, rather than every single American, and then make estimations based on their results. In the same way, we counted smaller samples of trees, rather than all of the trees individually to get an estimate of how many trees are in the park total.

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The Angle on Pool

The Angle on Pool (Math - High School)

Investigate how players think about angles in the game of pool. This video focuses on how using forward and reverse spin effects the rebound angle of the cue ball and how angles help to correctly aim your bank shot taking math out of the classroom and into the real world.

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Equivalent Expressions Using Exponents

Equivalent Expressions Using Exponents (Math - High School)

Apply your critical thinking skills to learn about multiplication and division of exponents. This interactive exercise focuses on positive and negative exponents and combining exponents in an effort to get you to recognize patterns and determine a rule.

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The Physics of Baseball: The Pitch (Grades 6-10)

The Physics of Baseball: The Pitch (Grades 6-10)

The first program in this series takes a look at the physics of the pitch. There's a lot of exciting physics to explore in the 60-feet-6-inch path from the pitching rubber — 10 inches above the playing field — to the batter standing at home plate. The Pitch takes a look at gravity, air drag and the Magnus force (three forces controlling trajectory once the pitcher releases the ball) and how the pitcher can use these forces to manipulate the path of the ball.

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The Physics of Baseball: The Hit (Grades 6-10)

The Physics of Baseball: The Hit (Grades 6-10)

The second video picks up where the first one left off; this one emphasizes the perspective of energy. The Hit focuses on kinetic energy, the coefficient of restitution and Newton's laws of motion, as well as how the quantity of energy of speed and mass changes as a result of the batter hitting the ball.

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The Physics of Baseball: Running the Bases (Grades 6-10)

The Physics of Baseball: Running the Bases (Grades 6-10)

What's baseball without players running the bases? The third program looks at how ball players apply Newton's first and second laws when they are running the bases. While base running is strictly between the runner and the clock and has nothing to do with the forces between the bat and ball, there's still plenty of physics to explore. Running the Bases takes a look at the concepts of force, mass, inertia and acceleration.

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The Physics of Baseball: The Flight (Grades 6-10)

The Physics of Baseball: The Flight (Grades 6-10)

The final program is devoted to the ball's flight after the batter's hit. The Flight takes into consideration perfect projectile motion, launch angle, air drag, turbulence, temperature, air density and, of course, the Magnus force — all the factors that go into sending a baseball from home plate over the fence more than 350 feet away.

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The Energy Lab Interactive (Science - High School)

The Energy Lab Interactive (Science - High School)

Use scientific data to design renewable energy systems for cities across the U.S., in this interactive from the NOVA Energy Lab. In the research challenge, investigate what energy is, how it can be converted into useful forms, and why some sources are running low. You'll also have the chance to compete with others to see whose designs can produce the most power.

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Covalent Bonding (Science - High School)

Covalent Bonding (Science - High School)

This interactive activity from ChemThink describes covalent bonding—a type of chemical bond that involves the sharing of electrons. Investigate the attractive and repulsive forces that act on atomic particles and how the sharing of electrons can keep atoms together. See how two hydrogen atoms interact with each other to create a covalent bond. Learn about trends in the periodic table and how electrostatic potential energy determines the bond length. Also, learn about naming conventions for covalent compounds.

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NOVA: Cracking Your Genetic Code | The Promise and Perils of Genetic Technologies

NOVA: Cracking Your Genetic Code | The Promise and Perils of Genetic Technologies (Science - High School)

In this interactive lesson, students examine technologies that help scientists better understand and manipulate the human genome—the complete set of genes that all of us possess. Students also learn about the ethical concerns that some people have over how these technologies are being used today and how they may be used in the future.

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Does Climate Change Cause Extreme Weather? | Above the Noise (Science - High School)

Does Climate Change Cause Extreme Weather? | Above the Noise (Science - High School)

Fluctuations in weather happen all the time. But sometimes, those fluctuations can get extreme, making disasters like hurricanes and heatwaves more intense. What role does climate change play in extreme weather?

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Up Close: Young People in World War II | Youth in WWII (Social Studies - High School)

Up Close: Young People in World War II | Youth in WWII (Social Studies - High School)

Discover how World War II affected the lives of young people, at home and on the battlefield, in Europe and America, through this unique interactive experience. Use this set of eight scenarios to explore and analyze artifacts, documents, photographs, and other primary sources, many from the International Museum of World War II. Each scenario offers a virtual tour through a specific experience of World War II, not only providing historical context but also revealing the ways in which young people thought, felt, and took action during this unprecedented global event.

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American Creed: Condoleezza Rice’s Family Matters

American Creed: Condoleezza Rice’s Family Matters

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David M. Kennedy come together to ask: what ideals do we share in common? Their spirited inquiry frames the stories of citizen-activists striving to bring communities together across deepening divides. In this collection find classroom ready video clips to support teaching with AMERICAN CREED. What ideals do you and your family hold that reflect what it means to be American?

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Digital Skills

Cut and Paste Proofs for Triangle Congruence

Complete formal proofs to show triangles congruence.

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Supporting Instructional Videos:

Documenting Communities

Documenting Communities | Media Arts Toolkit

Berea College’s Partners for Education partnered with communities in 10 Kentucky Appalachian counties to develop the Our Creative Promise website to showcase the region’s creative assets. They invited schools in each county to engage students in creating artworks to celebrate the unique attributes of their communities. Students wrote poetry, painted murals, created sculptures, recorded interviews, and wrote songs.

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Teaching and Learning About "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross"

Teaching and Learning About "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross"

Explore how to introduce Reconstruction using video from “The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.” with specific pre- and post- viewing techniques.

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Newton’s First Law: Fast Forward

Newton’s First Law: Fast Forward

We get a little background on Sir Isaac Newton, along with a detailed look at his First Law of Motion.

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Human Performance and Data

Human Performance and Data

Students learn how interesting statistics and data collection can be when used in real-life human performance experiments. Students will learn about univariate and multivariate data and how experiments are impacted by data gathering. This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

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