Math and Science Gumbo
Western Reserve Public Media
 

Root Beer Floats: States of Matter

Overview of Lesson

The focus of this lesson is to make root beer floats and learn about the states of matter.

 

Goal

Students will discover the differences between a solid, a liquid and a gas.


Objectives

  • Students will follow the directions in a recipe.

  • Students will successfully measure ingredients.

  • Students will discover what chemical and physical changes occur when ice cream is added to root beer.

 

Ohio Academic Content Standards

Science
Physical Sciences

Benchmark A:
Compare the characteristics of simple physical and chemical changes.

Indicator:
Nature of Matter

2. Identify characteristics of a simple chemical change. When a new material is made by combining two or more materials, it has chemical properties that are different from the original materials.

Benchmark B:
Identify and describe the physical properties of matter in its various states.

Indicator:
Nature of Matter

4. Explain that matter has different states (solid, liquid, gas) and that each state has distinct physical changes.

 

Materials

  • Measuring cup

  • Root beer

  • Vanilla ice cream

  • Ice cream scoop

  • Plastic cups

 

Procedure

  1. Have the students measure 1/2 cup of root beer and pour it into cup.

  2. Next they should add two scoops of ice cream.

  3. Have them slowly add more root beer to the cup and observe what happens.

  4. What is produced? Is this a physical or chemical change? (It is a chemical change, because a new substance was formed and cannot easily be separated.)

  5. On a separate sheet of paper, have the students draw and label the solid, liquid and gas produced when making the root beer float. Have the students also write a brief explanation as to what has occurred and why.

    Note:
    Ice cream = solid
    Root beer = liquid
    Air bubbles = gas

 

Evaluation

Evaluate drawings and explanations. Use the included rubric for evaluation.

Rubric for Root Beer Floats: States of Matter

CATEGORY 4 3 2 1
Strategy / Procedures Typically uses an efficient and effective strategy to solve the problem(s). Typically uses an effective strategy to solve the problem(s). Sometimes uses an effective strategy to solve problems, but does not do it consistently. Rarely uses an effective strategy to solve problems.
Mathematical and Scientific Concepts Explanation shows complete understanding of the mathematical and scientific concepts used to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows substantial understanding of the mathematical and scientific concepts used to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows some understanding of the mathematical and scientific concepts needed to solve the problem(s). Explanation shows very limited understanding of the underlying concepts needed to solve the problem(s) OR is not written.
Mathematical and Scientific Reasoning Uses complex and refined mathematical and scientific reasoning. Uses effective mathematical and scientific reasoning. Shows some evidence of mathematical and scientific reasoning. Shows little evidence of mathematical and scientific reasoning.
Neatness, Organization, Grammar and Spelling The work is presented in a neat, clear, organized fashion that is easy to read. The work is presented in a neat and organized fashion that is usually easy to read. Grammar and spelling are generally correct. The work is presented in an organized fashion but may be hard to read at times. There are some grammar and spelling errors. The work appears sloppy and unorganized. It is hard to know what information goes together. Grammar and spelling are poor.

 

 
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